Heritage and future: the planned industrial city of Uralmasch

   

The future of Sozgorod? Analysis on the change of working, living and living environment in Uralmasch, Russland

Since the collapse of the socialist model and the increasing effectiveness of globalization and neo-liberalization, the traditional spatial patterns and functions are changing within the cities of Eastern Europe and with it the socio-cultural and materialized living environments of its people. Particularly profound changes are experienced by the new industrial cities of the Soviet era in Russia, the so-called Sozgorod. Planned and built as an integrated city with high architectural aspirations and extensive socio-cultural and transport infrastructure, it represented socialism’s ideal interaction between working and living. At its center was a single large combination as the employer, client and operator of socio-cultural infrastructure. Nowadays, this economic basis of the city is crumbling and changing. This raises questions on the future of Sozgorod: questions on the conservation of the socialist (cultural) architectural heritage of the city and its further development –oriented towards the needs of the people- in view of the changed interaction between working and living.

Consequently, goals of the student research project are recommendations for the needs-based and future-oriented further development of the selected exemplary Sozgorod „Uralmasch“, based on the changed interaction between the functions of the work city „working“ and „living“. The recommendations are aimed both at the valorization of the living environment and architectural heritage of the work city, as well as the interconnection of the area with the agglomeration Yekaterinburg where it is situated.

Author:
Nadezda Krasilnikova

Category:
Student project

Course type:
M3

Timeframe:
Summer semester 2015

Department responsible:
Junior Professorship Conservation of Cultural Heritage
Prof.Dr.-Ing. Carola Neugebauer

Keywords:
socialist planned city, socialist cultural architectural heritage
urban conservation development